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'A little bit off the mark' - Paine criticizes DRS technology after day two decisions
Australia News

'A little bit off the mark' - Paine criticizes DRS technology after day two decisions

Tim Paine was left disappointed by cricket's Decision Review System after his controversial dismissal on day two of the Boxing Day Test between Australia and New Zealand.

The Australia skipper put together a gutsy effort with the bat and was eyeing his maiden Test ton before being removed by Neil Wagner for 79.

Paine was struck on the pad by the left-arm paceman bowling around the wicket and the fielding side's appeal for lbw was initially turned down by the on-field umpire.

Following a review opted by the visitors, hawkeye returned three reds forcing a visibly flustered Paine to walk back to the pavilion.

When asked about his views on the specific Wagner delivery that got him out, Paine replied: "Don't start."

"I thought from the length it pitched, and the bloke bowling around the wicket, it's pretty difficult to hit you in line, and hit the stumps," he told the broadcaster ABC.

Australia's luck with the DRS worsened as the day progressed since Ross Taylor was saved by a review despite being given out by the umpire off a James Pattinson delivery.

The ball appeared to be hitting the stumps but the tracking technology showed it climbing over the top of the bails, once again leaving the Australian players baffled.

Some commentators also questioned the accuracy of the DRS in light of these two decisions.

"And then you get one late tonight which, the guy's stuck on the crease, he's hit really full and it's going over, so it's disappointing and it makes me angry," Paine said.

"I've got a few doubts, no doubt about that," he added of the technology's precision in predicting the ball trajectory.

"I won't go into it too far because I'll get in trouble but I'm just seeing time and time again, what I see to the naked eye, or watching it on television in real time, and then what it comes up is sometimes a little bit off the mark."